OFSTED REPORT - 03/10/16

 

The Wonder Years

 

Day Nursery Ltd.

  Arundel House, 50 Church Hill, Wednesbury, West Midlands, WS10 9DJ 

Inspection date - 3 October 2016

Previous inspection date - 5 September 2013

The quality and standards of the early years provision

   

 

 

This inspection: Good

 

 

 

2

Previous inspection: Good

2

Effectiveness of the leadership and management       Good

2

Quality of teaching, learning and assessment            Good

2

Personal development, behaviour and welfare           Good

2

Outcomes for children                                            Good

2

Summary of key findings for parents

This provision is good

  • ?  Staff develop effective partnerships with parents, other providers and local schools. They share information about individual children's care and learning needs. This ensures there is consistency and continuity for children.

  • ?  Children are cared for by staff that are warm and engaging. This helps children to develop strong emotional attachments, settle in quickly and build on their readiness to learn. Children behave well. They demonstrate a high regard for one another and, as a result, build strong friendships.

  • ?  Staff share information about children's next steps in learning with their parents. They provide daily written and verbal feedback about their child's day in the nursery. This helps to build on parents' confidence in supporting their child's continued learning at home.

  • ?  The registered person ensures that the manager, staff, parents and their children are meaningfully included in the self-evaluation processes. This helps to make sure clear targets for further improvement are identified and acted upon to meet the needs of all children. As a result, outcomes for children are good.

    It is not yet outstanding because:

  • ?  Staff do not consistently find out what parents already know about their child's learning and development when they first start to help inform the assessments of the starting points for their learning.

  • ?  Staff do not provide the same level of opportunity for children who prefer to learn outdoors as that which is available for those who prefer to play and learn indoors.

What the setting needs to do to improve further

To further improve the quality of the early years provision the provider should:

  • ?  strengthen partnerships with parents and support them more effectively to share what they know about their child's achievements when they first join the setting and use this information to sharpen their initial assessments

  • ?  provide further opportunities for children who like to play outdoors to build successfully on their learning in their preferred environment.

    Inspection activities

  • ?  The inspector observed the quality of teaching during activities indoors and outdoors and assessed the impact this has on children's learning.

  • ?  The inspector completed a joint observation with the nursery manager.

  • ?  The inspector held a meeting with the nursery manager. She looked at relevant documentation, such as the nursery's self-evaluation and evidence of the suitability of staff working in the nursery.

  • ?  The inspector spoke to parents during the inspection and took account of their views.

Inspector

Mary Henderson

 

Inspection findings

Effectiveness of the leadership and management is good

The arrangements for safeguarding are effective. All staff attend regular child protection training. This helps them to identify the possible signs of abuse and neglect and to know what to do and who to contact to keep children safe and well. Staff are vigilant in checking all indoor and outdoor areas throughout the day. This helps to identify and minimise all possible hazards to children. All staff are provided with one-to-one meetings with the manager, giving them time to discuss their training and any confidential issues and concerns that need to be addressed. The manager monitors the educational programmes effectively. This helps to ensure that children are progressing well in all aspects of their learning and development.

Quality of teaching, learning and assessment is good

Staff provide a range of opportunities for children to explore their imagination. They encourage older children to choose their own action rhymes and sing and dance along to music. Staff use demonstration well with the children, encouraging them all to join in with their friends as they become excited and well engaged. Some children choose to play their musical instruments as they join in with the activity. During such times, staff use a range of questioning techniques to help children think and talk about what they are doing. This helps to build on their communication skills. Younger children become imaginative as they use tools and containers to make pies and cups of tea in the sand. Babies explore their imagination as they make marks in the paints, creating their own artwork to take home or display in their playroom. This builds on younger children's physical skills. Staff use demonstration and a running commentary with younger children during these activities to build on their listening and understanding skills. All children are encouraged to have a go and keep trying during their activities. This helps to develop their 'can do' approach to learning. This fosters children's readiness for the next stage in their learning and for their move on to school.

Personal development, behaviour and welfare are good

Children are provided with a healthy, balanced diet. They take manageable risks in their play under the close supervision of staff. During outdoor play, children ride their trikes, climb and balance using a range of equipment. They laugh and giggle, enjoying themselves as they chase their friends around in the fresh air. This helps children to develop a positive attitude towards living a healthy lifestyle.

Outcomes for children are good

Staff are strong role models for all children in their care. They help children to share and take turns with the toys. Children demonstrate a love of books as they sit in the comfy areas with their friends and talk about their favourite characters. They have lots of opportunities to make marks using a broad range of tools during planned and spontaneous activities. All children, including those in receipt of funding, make good progress in their learning and development.

Setting details

Unique reference number:                           255158

Local authority:                                             Sandwell

Inspection number:                                      1063860

Type of provision:                                         Full-time provision

Day care type:                                               Childcare - Non-Domestic

Registers:                                                      Early Years Register,              Compulsory Childcare Register, Voluntary Childcare Register

Age range of children:                                  0 - 10

Total number of places:                               103

Number of children on roll:                            80

Name of registered person:                        Hilary Walker

Registered person unique reference number: RP511564

Date of previous inspection:                       5 September 2013

Telephone number:                                      0121 556 6979

The Wonder Years Day Nursery was registered in 1997. The nursery employs 18 members of childcare staff. Of these, one holds an early years qualification at level 6, one at level 5, one at level 4 and seven at level 3. The nursery opens from Monday to Friday for 51 weeks of the year. Sessions are from 7.30am until 6.15pm. The nursery also provides after school and holiday care. The nursery provides funded early education places for two- , three- and four-year-old children. It supports a number of children who speak English as an additional language.

This inspection was carried out by Ofsted under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006 on the quality and standards of provision that is registered on the Early Years Register. The registered person must ensure that this provision complies with the statutory framework for children’s learning, development and care, known as the early years foundation stage.

Any complaints about the inspection or the report should be made following the procedures set out in the guidance ‘Complaints procedure: raising concerns and making complaints about Ofsted’, which is available from Ofsted’s website: www.gov.uk/government/organisations/ofsted. If you would like Ofsted to send you a copy of the guidance, please telephone 0300 123 4234, or email enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk.

The Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills (Ofsted) regulates and inspects to achieve excellence in the care of children and young people, and in education and skills for learners of all ages. It regulates and inspects childcare and children's social care, and inspects the Children and Family Court Advisory Support Service (Cafcass), schools, colleges, initial teacher training, work-based learning and skills training, adult and community learning, and education and training in prisons and other secure establishments. It assesses council children’s services, and inspects services for looked after children, safeguarding and child protection.

If you would like a copy of this document in a different format, such as large print or Braille, please telephone 0300 123 4234, or email enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk.

You may reuse this information (not including logos) free of charge in any format or medium, under the terms of the Open Government Licence. To view this licence, visit www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/, write to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives, Kew, London TW9 4DU, or email: psi@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk.

This publication is available at www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/120354.

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                    OFSTED INSPECTION - 05/09/13

Inspection date

Previous inspection date

 05/09/2013

  27/01/2009   

The quality and standards of the early years provision

This inspection:

   2      

Previous inspection:

  3   

 

How well the early years provision meets the needs of the range of children who attend

2

The contribution of the early years provision to the well-being of children

2

The effectiveness of the leadership and management of the early years provision

2

 

The quality and standards of the early years provision

 

  This provision is      good      

 

 

 

Staff's positive and enthusiastic engagement with children significantly enhances their enthusiasm to learn, and to form strong bonds and relationships with adults and each other.

 

 

 Partnership working is highly effective, leading to children's enhanced progress, in all aspects of their development and learning, in the nursery and at home.

 

 

 Managers and staff have a clear view of their successes and achievements, resulting in a highly committed and professional team approach. This significantly enhances children's care and learning experiences.

 

 

 Children behave well and thoroughly enjoy their time at the nursery, because staff take into account their individual needs and interests. This fosters a culture of respect and tolerance.

 

 

  It is not yet outstanding   because   

 

 

 

 The outdoor play areas are not yet fully developed and used to their full potential. This minimises opportunities for children to play outdoors more often, and to enhance their natural explorations.

 

 

 Children do not always have the opportunity to develop their self-care skills and independence by for example, helping with simple food preparation tasks at snack time.

 

Information about this inspection

Inspections of registered early years provision are:

§  scheduled at least once in every inspection cycle the current cycle ends on 31 July 2016

§  scheduled more frequently where Ofsted identifies a need to do so, for example where provision was previously judged inadequate

§  brought forward in the inspection cycle where Ofsted has received information that suggests the provision may not be meeting the legal requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage or where assessment of the provision identifies a need for early inspection

§  prioritised where we have received information that the provision is not meeting the requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage and which suggests children may not be safe

§  scheduled at the completion of an investigation into failure to comply with the requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage.

  

The provision is also registered on the voluntary  and  compulsory parts of the Childcare Register. This report includes a judgment about compliance with the requirements of that register.

Inspection activities

 

 

 The inspector observed activities in the nursery play rooms and in the garden.

  

 

 The inspector held meetings with the manager of the provision, and conducted a joint observation of a planned activity in the pre-school room.

  

 

 The inspector looked at children's assessment records and planning documentation.

  

 

 The inspector checked evidence of suitability and qualifications of staff working with children, the provider's self-evaluation form and improvement plan.

  

 

 The inspector took account of the views of parents, staff and children spoken to on the day, and from information included in the settings own parent survey.

 

Inspector

  Jayne Rooke 

Full Report

Information about the setting

Wonder Years Day Nursery was registered in 1997 and is on the Early Years Register and the compulsory and voluntary parts of the Childcare Register. It is situated in converted business premises in Wednesbury, West Midlands and is managed by private ownership. The nursery serves the local and surrounding area and is accessible to all children. It operates from four main care areas on the ground floor of the premises and there is an enclosed area available for outdoor play.

The nursery employs 14 members of childcare staff. All hold appropriate early years qualifications at level 3 and above. The manager holds an early years degree. The nursery opens Monday to Friday all year round. Sessions are from 7.30am until 6.15pm. The nursery operates an after school club during school term time and holidays. Children attend for a variety of sessions. There are currently 88 children attending who are in the early years age group. The nursery provides funded early education for two-, three- and four-year-old children. It supports a number of children who speak English as an additional language and children with special educational needs and/or disabilities.

 

What the setting needs to do to improve further

  

   

        

 

To further improve the quality of the early years provision the provider should:  

 

 

 extend opportunities for children to develop their self-care skills through the daily routine, for example, by encouraging them to try more varied food textures and tastes and to help with the preparation of food and drink extend opportunities for all children to use the outdoor areas more often, to enhance their physical and sensory explorations.

 

 

 

Inspection judgements

How well the early years provision meets the needs of the range of children who attend

Staff provide a broad range of interesting and stimulating activities and games, which successfully promote children's learning and development. They enthusiastically engage with children of all ages, which helps children to develop their speech, language and communication skills, at an early stage. Children are motivated to explore their surroundings, because a wide range of attractive toys and equipment are readily accessible to them. Consequently, all children develop the characteristics of effective learning. For example, older boys make considered choices about what they want to do and who they want to play with. They work cooperatively together to build a road track out of bricks. They develop planning and negotiation skills, as they decide how many bricks to use, and how to lay out the road track. They learn how to tolerate and respect each other's ideas, as they take turns to place the bricks into place, and to re-design the original layout. This helps them to think critically, form positive relationships and behave respectfully.

Girls and boys concentrate intently on a self-chosen mathematical task. They sort and organise colourful objects by weight, shape and size. They test out what they know and understand, by using the balancing scales to find out which side is heavy or light. They develop their knowledge further through the skilful interactions of staff, who help them to work out how to balance the scales equally.

Children thoroughly enjoy role play and creative arts, where they express their own thoughts and ideas. Boys actively seek out the dressing-up clothes and home play equipment, to develop their imaginative play. Girls show high levels of fascination, as they tip and pour water into a variety of containers. They bathe dollies in the water play, demonstrating familiarity with domestic routines. Children have many opportunities to write, draw and make patterns in a variety of ways. Consequently, they use sand and other materials to make marks. They hold pencils, crayons and paintbrushes with increasing control and coordination, as they begin to form recognisable shapes and letters. Older babies show an increased awareness of print in the environment, as they look at and point to, the words and pictures displayed on a nursery rhyme poster. Staff instinctively respond to this spontaneous interest, by singing the words to the rhyme, much to the delight of the children.

Pre-school children are well prepared for their next stage of learning and school, because staff involve them in group activities, which enhance their listening and concentration skills. They sit happily together and respond to carefully considered questions, which help them to successfully recall and use, initial letters and sounds. Children at different stages of development, receive excellent levels of support and praise, to help them demonstrate their abilities and understanding. As a result, children take pride in their achievements and become highly motivated to succeed.

Children develop their physical skills, during their routine play outdoors. Younger children move their bodies and legs together, to move small wheeled toys around obstacles. They actively explore the outdoor learning area, as they follow the pathway under the willow tunnel, and move round to the other areas of the garden. Staff skilfully draw children's attention to the outdoor musical instruments, encouraging them to sing and express their creativity, through this inviting resource. However, there is scope to extend the outdoor learning experiences for all children, beyond the routine times of the day.

Staff demonstrate a secure understanding of the educational programmes. They skilfully use observation and assessment to identify what children can already do. This successfully guides their planning, across each area of learning. As a result, they adopt an individual approach to each child's learning journey. Children with special educational needs and/or disabilities, and those who speak English as an additional language, benefit from strong partnerships between staff, parents and external agencies. This enables key persons to effectively support each child's learning and development, as they progress towards the early learning goals.

The contribution of the early years provision to the well-being of children

Staff demonstrate kind and loving attitudes towards the children. They pay close attention to each child's needs and manage their individual care routines with sensitivity and warmth. Children's sleep and meal routines, are discussed and agreed with parents, before children start to attend. This helps staff to provide consistent and supportive care, throughout the day. As a result, children settle quickly and separate more easily from their parents.

Children form strong bonds and attachments to their special key person, during their induction phase. Staff help them to broaden their social interactions with other adults and children, as they transfer and move between the different rooms. This helps children to develop their confidence and independence.

Children's safety is prioritised, as staff are vigilant about supervising them at all times. For example, they keep a watchful eye on children as they play and sleep. They have strengthened procedures to count the number of children playing inside and outdoors, to prevent children being left alone. They help children to understand how to manage risk, by gently guiding them to play carefully, as they move around the nursery and garden. 

Children show kindness and respect towards others, because staff are positive role models. They sensitively support children when they become upset, or if they hurt someone, by offering comfort and re-assurance, and by carefully explaining how to be thoughtful and considerate. This helps children to express and manage their emotions, in a safe environment. Children learn about the diverse world, through practical projects and varied celebratory festivals. This enhances their understanding of people and communities.

Children benefit from regular exercise because they engage in active physical play and games. They play outside in the fresh air, once or twice a day, when it is their turn to play in the garden. They enjoy healthy meals and drinks, which provide good nutritional value. They are offered a suitable balance of sweet, savoury and fruit snacks, during the morning and afternoon. Babies and young children sleep and rest, according to their individual routines. This promotes their healthy growth and development. Older children confidently manage their personal needs, when it is time to visit the snack table or the toilet. For instance, they know that it is important to use the soap to wash their hands clean and have good access to individual paper towels, to prevent the spread of infection. They feed themselves competently, using child-sized cutlery. However, they are not always encouraged to participate in the simple preparation of food, or to serve themselves to their drink at snack time. This minimises opportunities for them to develop practical skills and independence.

The nursery is bright, warm and welcoming to children, parents and visitors. Rooms are well-organised to accommodate the different needs of each age group. Toys are within easy reach of children, which helps them to make choices and decisions of their own. Staff use their time well to support children's individual needs and to work consistently as a team. As a result, children's emotional well-being is assured. Partnerships between parents, other providers and schools are consistently strong. This promotes continuity for all children within the nursery and beyond.

The effectiveness of the leadership and management of the early years provision

Children make good progress towards the early learning goals, because staff have a secure understanding of how they learn and develop. Consequently, they plan and provide activities which develop each child's skills and abilities. This helps children to prepare for their next stage of learning, including those with specific and identified needs.

Safeguarding procedures are robust. This ensures that children are protected from abuse and neglect. For example, staff confidently describe what to look for and how to respond, to any concerns about a child's well-being. They know that it is their individual responsibility to protect children and keep them safe. A regular review of the safeguarding and other policies, re-affirms their roles and responsibilities. This ensures that staff act promptly, if they are concerned about a child's welfare. Secure recruitment and vetting procedures are systematically followed, by the owners and manager of the nursery. This includes rigorous checks to ensure that staff are suitable to work with children, at all times.

The manager leads a culture of reflective practice, as part of the continuing self-evaluation process. As a result, staff are highly committed to professional development and training. For example, the manager has recently achieved an early years degree and other staff have succeeded in attaining a level 4 qualification. This has inspired staff to implement new initiatives within the nursery, with a particular focus on parent engagement in children's learning. Consequently, children's development is enhanced, between the home and nursery. In addition, staff work successfully with other professional partners, to obtain specialist support for children with speech and communication difficulties. This helps them to quickly identify when additional help is needed. As a result, children's language skills are improved at an early stage. 

Parents and children's views are valued and listened to carefully, to address any concerns or to seek new ideas and suggestions. Parents speak highly of the nursery and value the warm and friendly atmosphere, and the professionalism of the staff. Older children say that they like to play at the nursery and have fun. Babies and young children appear happy, content and settled. This promotes positive and open relationships.

Recommendations from the previous inspection have largely been addressed. Consequently, staff plan effectively for children's learning and development, taking into account their different age range and abilities. The indoor environment is used flexibly, to enable children to explore freely. However, the outdoor area remains unused to its full potential. This minimises opportunities for children to extend their explorations outdoors.

The manager has since conducted a rigorous review of the risk assessment procedure, particularly in respect of incidents notified to Ofsted. As a result, details of risks, hazards and action taken to remove or minimise these, is clearly recorded. This ensures that children are cared for in a safe environment. The manager has successfully implemented a review of all policies, and conducts peer observations to monitor staff practice. This has resulted in significant improvements in the quality of care and learning provided. 

All of the required records are appropriately maintained and regularly reviewed, for the safe and efficient management of the nursery. For example, the manager is currently updating all of the parental responsibility information on each child's written registration record, to secure their safety and well-being.

   

The Childcare Register

 

The requirements for the compulsory part of the Childcare Register are

Met

  

The requirements for the voluntary part of the Childcare Register are

Met

 

 

   

What inspection judgements mean

Registered early years provision

Grade

Judgement

Description

Grade 1

Outstanding

Outstanding provision is highly effective in meeting the needs of all children exceptionally well. This ensures that children are very well prepared for the next stage of their learning.

Grade 2

Good

Good provision is effective in delivering provision that meets the needs of all children well. This ensures children are ready for the next stage of their learning.

Grade 3

Satisfactory

Satisfactory provision is performing less well than expectations in one or more of the key areas. It requires improvement in order to be good. 

Grade 4

Inadequate

Provision that is inadequate requires significant improvement and/or enforcement action. The provision is failing to give children an acceptable standard of early years education and/or is not meeting the safeguarding and welfare requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage. It will be inspected again within 12 months of the date of this inspection.

Met

 

The provision has no children on roll. The inspection judgement is that the provider continues to meet the requirements for registration.

Not met

 

The provision has no children on roll. The inspection judgement is that the provider does not meet the requirements for registration.

Inspection

 

This inspection was carried out by Ofsted under sections 49and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006 on the quality and standards of provision that is registered on the Early Years Register.  The registered person must ensure that this provision complies with the statutory framework for children’s learning, development and care, known as the Early Years Foundation Stage.

 

Setting details

Unique reference number

255158

Local authority

Sandwell

Inspection number

930919

Type of provision

        

Registration category

Childcare - Non-Domestic

Age range of children

0 - 17

Total number of places

103

Number of children on roll

88

Name of provider

  Hilary Walker 

Date of previous inspection

  27/01/2009 

Telephone number

  0121 556 6979 

Any complaints about the inspection or the report should be made following the procedures set out in the guidance ‘Complaints procedure: raising concerns and making complaints about Ofsted’, which is available from Ofsted’s website: www.ofsted.gov.uk. If you would like Ofsted to send you a copy of the guidance, please telephone 0300 123 4234, or email enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk.

Type of provision

For the purposes of this inspection the following definitions apply:

Full-time provision is that which operates for more than three hours.  These are usually known as nurseries, nursery schools and pre-schools and must deliver the Early Years Foundation Stage. They are registered on the Early Years Register and pay the higher fee for registration.

Sessional provision operates for more than two hours but does not exceed three hours in any one day. These are usually known as pre-schools, kindergartens or nursery schools and must deliver the Early Years Foundation Stage. They are registered on the Early Years Register and pay the lower fee for registration.

Childminders care for one or more children where individual children attend for a period of more than two hours in any one day. They operate from domestic premises, which are usually the childminder’s own home. They are registered on the Early Years Register and must deliver the Early Years Foundation Stage

Out of school provision may be sessional or full-time provision and is delivered before or after school and/or in the summer holidays. They are registered on the Early Years Register and must deliver the Early Years Foundation Stage. Where children receive their Early Years Foundation Stage in school these providers do not have to deliver the learning and development requirements in full but should complement the experiences children receive in school.

 

The Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills (Ofsted) regulates and inspects to achieve excellence in the care of children and young people, and in education and skills for learners of all ages. It regulates and inspects childcare and children's social care, and inspects the Children and Family Court Advisory Support Service (Cafcass), schools, colleges, initial teacher training, work-based learning and skills training, adult and community learning, and education and training in prisons and other secure establishments. It assesses council children’s services, and inspects services for looked after children, safeguarding and child protection.

 If you would like a copy of this document in a different format, such as large print or Braille, please telephone 0300 123 4234, or email enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk.

Piccadilly Gate, Store St., Manchester. M1 2WD

© Crown copyright 2012

 

Tel: 0121 556 6979

     0121 502 0279

Opening hours: 7.30 - 18.00

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Address

The Wonder Years Day Nursery Ltd.

Arundel House

50 Church Hill

Wednesbury

West Midlands

WS10 9DJ

Sat Nav Post Code WS10 9DQ

 

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